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Colorado PARCC tests show concerns in opt-outs, small gains in second year of scores

Aug 14, 2016 by

The battle over persuading older and, in particular, white Colorado students to take a slew of standardized tests at the end of the school year rolls on.

Data released Thursday showed less than 90 percent of students in grades 7-10 in the 2015-16 school year took the exams, which include the Colorado Measures of Academic Success tests in math, English language arts, science and social studies.

According to the Colorado Department of Education report, 88 percent of seventh-graders took tests this past school year (down from 88.7 percent in 2014-15); 83.5 percent of eighth-graders (down from 85 percent); 73 percent of ninth-graders (up from 70 percent); and 88.3 percent of 10th-graders (up from 61 percent). This was the first year for sophomores to take a pre-Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the exclusion of language arts and math tests for 10th- and 11th-graders.

Colorado has been a national leader in the movement to opt out of standardized tests, with critics saying the tests don’t truly measure academic progress. The state allows parents to let their kids skip the exams without penalty.

Source: Colorado PARCC tests show concerns in opt-outs, small gains in second year of scores – The Denver Post

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