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Common Core Mandates Will Harm Critical Thinking

Oct 28, 2012 by

by Sandra Stotsky –

Jay Mathews is one of the few education reporters who gets it. He understands that the heavy diet of informational reading Common Core mandates at every single grade level for the language arts or English class may decrease, not increase, “critical” or analytical thinking. But how are teachers and parents to know that black is white and freedom is slavery?  No one tells us how reading “informational” texts could necessarily stimulate “critical” thinking better than literary reading–or stimulate it at all.  

For example, how would the “informational” texts recommended by the National Council of Teachers of English for the secondary English curriculum stimulate analytical thinking more than, say,  a close reading of Pride and Prejudice?  According to a NCTE volume she co-authored, an Iowa English teacher has assigned her grade 10 students books about teenage marketing and the working poor–Branded by Alissa Quart and Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich–to address Common Core’s mandate.  Do these books present their “information” in such ambiguous or subtle ways that close reading is needed to figure out the authors’ messages?  In contrast, think how much class discussion is needed to help students understand the irony in Austen’s works.

Common Core thinks rigor is addressed by requiring reading and English teachers to use texts that increase regularly in complexity.  But, as American College Testing (ACT) notes, complexity is laden with literary features: it involves “characters,” “literary devices,” “tone,” “ambiguity,” “elaborate” structure, “intricate language,” and unclear intentions.  Reducing literary study means reducing the opportunity to develop in all students the analytical thinking once developed in just an elite group of students by the vocabulary, structure, ambiguity, point of view, figurative language, and irony in classic literary texts. 

Some ostrich-like supporters of Common Core claim that there will be no reduction in the amount of literature assigned and studied.  Tell that to English teachers who have been told to divide their reading instructional time as Common Core does: 10 reading standards for informational texts, 9 for literary texts.  And in grade 12, make it 70% informational, even though Common Core explicitly says English teachers shouldn’t be responsible for 70%.  How much they should be responsible for, Common Core’s architects don’t say. 

Reading researchers know there is absolutely no research to support the idea that more “literary non-fiction” or “informational” texts in the English class will increase students’ level of analytical thinking.  There is every reason to believe they will, instead, lower the level. 

via Common Core Mandates Will Harm Critical Thinking.

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