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COMMON CORE PORN VS. QUALITY LITERATURE

Oct 15, 2013 by

Common-Core-Standards-Lesson-Plan-Fifth-Grade-Readingby Donna Garner –

Unfortunately, porno authors (e.g., Toni Morrison, Cristina Garcia, etc.) have found their way onto the Common Core Standards list of exemplar selections.  Because teachers trapped in the Common Core know that their teaching evaluations will be tied to the individual scores made by their students on the Common Core national assessments, teachers are feeling pressured to teach these porno selections.

 

However, it is not just Common Core that has brought these offensive pieces of literature into classrooms.  For more than 33 years while I was an English teacher, I fought against the teaching of books and selections by such people as Toni Morrison, Cristina Garcia, and other similar writers — many of whom gained popularity not because of their writing skills but because of the multicultural, politically correct (PC) agenda that swept them into prominence in this country.

 

Along with the teachers who bought into the PC agenda, there were always those teachers who seemed to feel it was their duty in life to shock their students – to destroy  the little bit of children’s protective naiveté that they had left.  It seemed to elevate these teachers’ popularity among the students, and some of the teachers thrived on that.

 

Then, too, there were always those teachers who taught the below-grade-level books that contained lascivious content because students could and would read them on their own, and the teachers were then free to do other tasks.

Meanwhile, these misdirected teachers dragged their students deeper into the gutter on the pretense of “educating” them about society and people’s cultural lifestyles…

 

Upon occasion to try to make a point, I would bring a garbage can from the cafeteria into my classroom and would tell the students to write a descriptive paragraph in which they were to tell how the garbage looked, felt, smelled, tasted, and sounded.  The students were not allowed to get out of their seats to look into the garbage can.  Without exception, all of the students were able to describe the inside of the garbage can.

Then after volunteer students shared their paragraphs orally, I would always make the point that we do not have to get down into the garbage can to know what is in there.  We don’t have to cover ourselves up with filthy garbage to know it exists. We don’t need to expose ourselves to the garbage with all its dangerous germs to know those germs exist.  We certainly do not want to damage our own bodies by such actions.

 

Neither do we have to wallow around in “garbage” literature with its irreverent epithets, violence, sexualization, perversion, incorrect English grammar, etc. to know that it exists because debasing our minds can have the eventual effect of damaging the way we think, speak, and act.

 

When we studied the great classic pieces of literature and history, I would explain that there is a vast difference between excellent food vs. junk food.  Once we have tasted excellent food, we are never satisfied with junk food. Once we have been exposed to the great, time-honored classics (i.e., excellent food for thought), we will never be satisfied with junk selections.

 

Having taught thousands of students over those 33+ years and then having two sons and five grandchildren, I have seen them develop their reading tastes. As students read more of the great classics, they soon lose interest in the teen genre “junk food.”

 

While in junior high, one of our close friends was intrigued for about two months with The Hunger Games.  Another was fascinated with the Harry Potter books.  Once they got into high school and started reading more of the great classics, they never mentioned The Hunger Games and the Harry Potter books again.  These “junk food” selections will never stand the test of time because they are not great pieces of literature.

 

Great literary pieces make us better people from having read them. They have redeeming value. The characters, plots, and settings raise us to a higher level of thinking, speaking, and writing. The historical events teach us lessons from the past that give us direction for the future.

 

Impressionable children and teenagers need to identify with healthy role models that will elevate students’ behaviors and goals in life. Classic pieces of literature are time honored because great authors have been able to capture their readers’ imagination and lift them vicariously into another place and time.

 

Many students in our schools today live in dysfunctional homes where unbelievably bad things happen.  How unwise for educators to expose these students to “more of the same” – books that further depress students, leave them without any hope, and may lead to suicidal thoughts.

 

Children are not “little adults.”  They are not meant to deal with complex issues that adults do not even know how to handle.

 

Schools must and can do better.  Books by such authors as Toni Morrison, Cristina Garcia, and others whose books are filled with “garbage” and “junk food” should be replaced by the great time-honored pieces of literature and history.

 

It is not right to steal precious class time from students by immersing them in erotic, below-grade-level literature while at the same time neglecting the teaching of the classics which will help to build students’ English proficiency, vocabularies, and reading levels.  Students become better writers when they are immersed in great literary selections.

 

Classic pieces of literature do not have to be difficult to read to be considered a classic. I have lists of great literary selections for each grade level K through 12, yet many of these go begging while teachers teach “junk” and “garbage” selections instead.

 

Teachers cannot control what students experience outside of school, but teachers can certainly control what is given the stamp of approval in their own classrooms.  When a teacher teaches a selection by Toni Morrison, Cristina Garcia, and other such erotic authors, the teacher is sending a message of approval to his students no matter how the teacher tries to justify the literary choice.  Students tend to remember the erotic episodes and to forget the teacher’s justification explanations.

 

The sexualization of America can be laid partially at the feet of what is being taught in our schools. The mind is a valuable thing to waste.  Actions do have consequences.

 

Parents need to insist that teachers teach the great pieces of literature and history first and that these selections must be wholesome, uplifting, and edifying.

 

If the teachers refuse, then parents need to ask for an alternative literary selection for their own child; and the parents need to document the erotic passages in the offensive materials, go up the chain of command, and release these passages to the public.  The following examples describe parents who have done just that.

 

 

COMMON CORE IS CURRICULUM

 

10.13.13 – “Another Pornographic Novel on Common Core Exemplar List: The Bluest Eye

by Donna Garner — http://www.educationviews.org/porno-recommended-common-core-bluest-eye/

 

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9.13.13 — “UPDATE:  Common Core Porn Novel” – by Donna Garner —

http://educationviews.org/update-common-core-porn-novel-by-donna-garner-9-13-13/

 

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9.11.13 – “Porn at Buena High School in Sierra Vista, Arizona: Common Core” – by Donna Garner — http://www.redhotconservative.com/porn-at-buena-high-school-in-sierra-vista-arizona/

 

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9.11.13 – PODCAST – “Porn at Buena High, Sierra Vista, Arizona: Common Core”  —  Alice Linahan Community Conversationshttp://www.voicesempower.com/porn-at-buena-high-school-in-sierra-vista-common-core/

 

 

Donna Garner

Wgarner1@hot.rr.com

 

 

 

 

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