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Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. | 2014 Cyberbullying Examples

 

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OFFLINE DISTRESS DICTATES ONLINE RESPONSE

In addition to time and information shared while in cyberspace, advanced ICT and online safety skills also include awareness of how offline behavior and lifestyle can modify online behavior. Far too many adults and parents of children fail to be cognizant that offline circumstances and psychological stressors dictate and govern online behaviors. In this writer’s entire file of research and hours of investigation engaged in the formulation of the construct of iPredator, the one theme emphasized throughout his entire philosophical framework is as follows:

Offline Distress Dictates Online Response or ODDOR postulates that both a child and adult’s response to their offline environment is directly correlated to how they behave online. When home, school, work, finances or other offline factors are causing significant distress, research has proven online users of all ages are more apt to be less vigilant in their Internet safety tactics and more likely to engage in high risk online behaviors. Under the concept of D4 (distracted, distressed, discouraged or dysfunctional,) online users that have been highly stressed offline are profiles the iPredator seeks to target. Depending on the advanced IVI (iPredator Victim Intuition) of the iPredator, an online users ODDOR can be quickly recognized by an iPredator.

D4: Distracted, Distressed, Discouraged or Dysfunctional

INTERNET ADDICTION

Internet Addiction and Internet Use Disorder are synonymous terms describing the compulsive dependency people experience using Information and Communications Technology. Humanity is thriving at the beginning of the period called the Information Age whereby digital devices and electronic communication channels are a priori. Internet addiction, information technology, cyberspace and virtuality are new terms introduced to the English lexicon. Just as any new human experience, the Information Age and the growing dependency upon Information and Communications Technology is a proverbial “double edged sword”.

Contemporary Information Age society has now been introduced to Internet Addiction. In 2013, Internet Addiction and its psychopathology is a new mental illness for a new societal paradigm. In Mid-May 2013, this writer spent 3 days conducting research on Internet Use Disorder and the cornucopia of terms found were numerous.

INTERNET ABUSE & INTERNET DEPENDENCE DEFINITIONS

Internet Abuse: Internet Abuse (aka Internet Addiction & Internet Use Gaming Disorder) is an umbrella concept defining a child or adult’s compulsive and progressive abuse of the internet and electronic devices designed to obtain, exchange or disseminate information. Although the internet is the predominate arena in which Internet Abuse takes place, electronic devices and communications channels not internet enabled are also included in the definition. Internet Abuse causes dysfunctional cognitive, affective, behavioral & perceptual intrapersonal consequences accompanied with employment, academic, familial, peer & intimate partner interpersonal consequences.

On a continuum of severity, ranging from absent to mild, cessation of Internet and/or electronic device usage causes withdrawal symptomology, psychological and/or physiological, combined with perceptual tolerance. Also on a continuum of severity, Internet Abusive online users engage in criminal, deviant and/or deceptive online activities ranging from absent to severe.

The chronic and more debilitating condition, Internet Dependence, is more chronic, severe and self-destructive. Internet Abuse is segmented into six typologies as follows: Cyber Sex Fixated, Cyber Relationship Fixated, Internet Gaming & Online Commerce Fixated, Information Implosion Fixated, Dark Side Fixated and NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) Fixated. The NOS Fixated typology applies to internet abusing online users who share more than one typology, has a co-existing mental illness or medical condition causing psychiatric dysfunction.

Jimmy Kilpatrick-Education News-Delia Stafford-Haberman Foundation-Modern Day Aristotles

Internet Dependence: Internet Dependence (aka Internet Addiction & Internet Use Gaming Disorder) is an umbrella concept defining a child or adult’s compulsive and progressive dependency upon the internet and electronic devices designed to obtain, exchange or disseminate information. Although the internet is the predominate arena in which Internet Dependence takes place, electronic devices and communications channels not internet enabled are also included in the definition. Internet Dependence causes dysfunctional cognitive, affective, behavioral & perceptual intrapersonal consequences accompanied with employment, academic, familial, peer & intimate partner interpersonal consequences.

On a continuum of severity, ranging from mild to severe, cessation of Internet and/or electronic device usage causes withdrawal symptomology, psychological and/or physiological, combined with perceptual tolerance. Also on a continuum of severity, Internet Dependent online users engage in criminal, deviant and/or deceptive online activities ranging from mild to severe. The mild and less debilitating condition, Internet Abuse, is not as chronic, severe or self- destructive. Internet Dependence is segmented into six typologies as follows: Cyber Sex Fixated, Cyber Relationship Fixated, Internet Gaming & Online Commerce Fixated, Information Implosion Fixated, Dark Side Fixated and NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) Fixated. The NOS Fixated typology applies to internet dependent online users who share more than one typology, has a co-existing mental illness or medical condition causing psychiatric dysfunction.

Educators, parents and the community at large must treat cyberbullying as a societal toxic phenomenon. To thwart this growing epidemic, it is paramount the adult community becomes educated on the tactics cyberbullies use to taunt and victimize other vulnerable children.

Given the variety of methodologies cyberbullies use, provided below are the most commonly used cyberbullying tactics that were used in 2013 and likely to exist throughout 2014. Although most of the terms used to describe cyberbullying tactics are considered general knowledge by those who specialize in cyberbullying prevention & non-proprietary, they are many other terms that describe the same type of behavior. The most important goal is to understand the theme of each tactic in relationship to the tactics & methods children use to harm & disparage other children. Furthermore, many of the tactics listed are also used by adult ICT users engaged in cyber harassment, cyberstalking and cybercrime. A short description of each tactic is as follows;

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