Google Find us on Google+

How Greater Houston School Districts Fared In New Preliminary State Letter Grades

Jan 10, 2017 by

All Houston-area districts struggled to prepare students for college, earning a C or worse.

Laura Isensee –

Texas released preliminary A-F letter grades for public schools Friday, with many districts that met state standards under the old system now getting low marks.

The state’s Education Commissioner Mike Morath called the grades a “work-in-progress” report for lawmakers, who approved the new system two years ago.

“No inferences about official district or campus performance in the 2015–16 school year should be drawn from these ratings, and these ratings should not be considered predictors of future district or campus performance ratings,” Morath said in a statement.

In Greater Houston, just a few districts — Katy, Pearland and Tomball ISDs — earned A’s for how well students did on state standardized tests.

Most districts in the region earned A’s or B’s on student progress.

But all Houston-area districts struggled to prepare students for college, earning a C or worse. Houston ISD earned a D in that category, along with Humble, Alief and Katy.

“This is a much more detailed system as well as an easier system for people to understand,” said Bob Sanborn, CEO and president of Children at Risk.

The advocacy group has graded schools for years with its own letter grade system. Now Sanborn has served on the state committee that’s developed the new state report card.

The system has provoked districts and educators, who argue the letter grades stigmatize poor schools and make it harder to recruit top teachers and engage families. Many of them want to scrap it. More than 150 districts in Texas have adopted resolutions against the A-F system, such as Clear Creek ISD.

“They’re using convoluted metrics to determine rankings, which undermines the hard work of teachers and administrators and gives students and parents the raw end of the deal,” said Gary Godsey, executive director of the Association of Texas Professional Educators.

Sanborn said that no one likes to get graded, but he acknowledged one criticism.

“To just grade them isn’t enough for parents,” Sanborn said. “I think as a state what we are going to also have to make that commitment, that if a school is getting a D or an F, how are we going to help turn that around?”

So far all schools got grades in four areas: student achievement, student progress, closing performance gaps and readiness for college and career.

When the new grading system takes full effect next year in 2018, there will be another category for districts to evaluate student and community engagement.

All schools and districts will also receive an overall grade.

Source: How Greater Houston School Districts Fared In New Preliminary State Letter Grades – Houston Public Media

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Advertisements
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply

UA-24036587-1
%d bloggers like this: