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Privately-educated graduates THIRD more likely to get top jobs

Nov 21, 2013 by

Graduates who went to private schools still dominate modern Britain

Middle class children are being held back by ‘entrenched elitism’ which means the rich and privately-educated are a third more likely to get top jobs, a government adviser warned today.

Alan Milburn, the social mobility tsar, said it was not just children from poorer families who struggled to ‘move up and get on’.

In the latest high-profile attack on the privileged elite who run Britain, he said it was time to ‘break open the closed shop’ at the top of society.

David Cameron has been stung by criticism of the wealthy background of many in the Cabinet.

Former Tory Prime Minister Sir John Major took a swipe last month, warning the Conservatives cannot win if they fail to understand the ‘silent have-nots’ who suffer in ‘net curtain poverty’.

New research from the Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission found that privately-educated graduates are one-third more likely to get top jobs than state school-educated graduates.

In a speech today Mr Miliburn said: ‘A society where opportunities are frozen rather than fluid hurts more than those at the very bottom end. 

‘It hurts the people President Clinton once famously called the “forgotten middle class”.

‘They, and not just low income families, are the victims of entrenched elitism in our country.’

The former Labour Cabinet minister told social mobility experts that the problem did not affect just people from working class backgrounds, but was also a block on the aspirations of middle class families.

Part of this gap was explained by the fact that top employers continue to recruit from a narrow range of highly selective universities, where those who went to independent schools tend to be over-represented, said the Commission.

Research shows the increased probability of working in a top job if privately educate, compared with attending a state school

Research shows the increased probability of working in a top job if privately educate, compared with attending a state school

 

 

But it also found that even where two similarly qualified graduates have attended the same university and got the same degree, a privately-schooled graduate is still 8 per cent more likely to get a top job than a state-schooled one.

Mr Milburn added: ‘Social mobility relies on people across the income spectrum being able to move up and get on.

‘We have a twin problem in our country:  middle class aspirations and working class opportunities to advance are both being thwarted.’

Commission analysis suggested that some of the career advantage for privately-educated graduates comes from having social connections that state-educated graduates are less likely to enjoy. But it found that most of the gap is unexplained.

10.5% of all graduates work in a top professional job, while privately educated graduates are 6 percentage points more likely than state school graduates to work in these jobs

10.5% of all graduates work in a top professional job, while privately educated graduates are 6 percentage points more likely than state school graduates to work in these jobs

 

 

Mr Milburn said the expansion of the middle classes would help more people to break through into the top of society.

He said: ‘A twin solution is needed: we need to break open the closed shop at the top of British society and expand the middle. 

‘It should be our country’s ambition to create a bigger middle class with more avenues for advancement. A growing middle-class is the foundation for a more mobile country.’

Mr Milburn outlined a five-point policy agenda, involving expanding early years education; paying the best teachers more for working in disadvantaged areas; opening up universities to a wider pool of talent and making vocational education a national priority; increasing the minimum wage; and expanding entry to the professions by getting firms to recruit from a wider range of universities and ending unpaid internships.

via Privately-educated graduates THIRD more likely to get top jobs | Mail Online.

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