Google Find us on Google+

TEXANS, STOP AP U. S. HISTORY TESTS FROM BEING IMPLEMENTED – ILLEGAL IN TEXAS

Jul 11, 2014 by

ACTION ALERT – TEXANS, STOP AP U. S. HISTORY TESTS FROM BEING IMPLEMENTED – ILLEGAL IN TEXAS

 

Please contact the Texas Attorney General’s office and urge him to stop the AP U. S. History Framework from being implemented this fall. 

 

David Coleman is the lead architect of the Common Core.  He then became the president of The College Board and has publicly promised that all College Board products will align with the Common Core.

 

The new AP U. S. History Framework is illegal according to our state law (HB 462) and the most recent opinion by the Texas Attorney General. 

 

We Texans must alert the TAG that he needs to stop AP U. S. History Framework from being put into place in Texas because not only is it aligned with the Common Core, but it is also not aligned with the required Texas curriculum standards (TEKS).

                                                                                       

TAG Phone No. – 512-463-2100

TAG E-mail Address – greg.abbott@texasattorneygeneral.gov

 

========

7.10.14 – National Review

 

New War Over High School U.S. History

By Stanley Kurtz

July 10, 2014 11:44 AM

 

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/382400/new-war-over-high-school-us-history-stanley-kurtz

 

Excerpts from this article:

 

There are serious questions about the legality of the new AP U.S. History Exam, insofar as it may conflict with existing history standards in a number of states.  These questions, however, as well as public debate over this massive and tremendously controversial change, have been largely suppressed by the stealthy way in which the College Board has rolled out the new test.

 

…Sources tell me, however, that a complete sample exam has be released, although only to certified AP U.S. History teachers.  Those teachers have been warned, under penalty of law and the stripping of their AP teaching privileges, not to disclose the content of the new sample AP U.S. History Exam to anyone.

 

This is clearly an effort to silence public debate over these heavily politicized and illegitimately nationalized standards.  If the complete sample test was available, the political nature of the new test would become evident. Public scrutiny of the sample test would also expose potential conflicts between the new exam and existing state standards.  This is why the College Board has kept the test secret and threatened officially certified AP U.S. History teachers with severe penalties for revealing the test.

 

…It is true that the new history framework allows teachers to include examples of their choice.  Yet the framework also insists that the examples must be used to illustrate the themes and concepts behind the official College Board vision.

 

…But any teacher who presents a full unit on the principles of the American Constitution taught in the traditional way would be severely disadvantaging his students.  So while allowing some minor flexibility on details, the new AP U.S. History framework effectively forces teachers to train their students in a leftist, blame-America-first reading of history, while omitting traditional treatments of our founding principles.

 

Texas is at the forefront of the resistance to the new AP U.S. History Exam, but the battle is not going well.  Ken Mercer, a member of the Texas School Board, is attempting to introduce a resolution rebuking and rejecting the new AP U.S. History Exam.  Unfortunately, he is now being told that he must wait to introduce the resolution until September, when it will be too late.

 

Texas makes up about 10 percent of the College Board’s market.  Were Texas to reject the new AP U.S. History Exam, the entire project could be put into doubt.  It is imperative that Ken Mercer be allowed to introduce his resolution.

 

Texans need to wake up and demand that Mercer’s resolution be introduced and passed as soon as possible.  The rest of the country needs to wake up and demand similar action in every state.

 

The public should also insist that the College Board release its heretofore secret sample AP U.S. History test for public scrutiny and debate.  There is no excuse for withholding this test from the public…

 

Donna Garner

Wgarner1@hot.rr.com

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPrint this pageEmail this to someone

1 Comment

  1. Mike ferguson

    The comments concerning the APUSH are mostly in error. Let me clear up a few issues:
    1. The Texas TEKS for the AP curriculum state: “follow the curriculum of the College Board”. There is NO other TEKS for our course.
    2. The historical themes referenced are standard history themes in use for decades: historical thinking, chronology, peopling, geographic influences, etc. no instructions have been given stating that these themes be taught from a “leftist” viewpoint.
    3. The graders of the exam are not chosen for a particular political philosophy, and are NOT going to interpret correctness of answers based on any interpretation other than, did the student support her or his argument cogently and with factual analysis.
    4. We, the AP US History teachers, are trained professionals who will not change there teaching strategies in any fundamental way to meet the new guidelines of the College Board. They can tell us what facts will be included on the multiple choice part of the exam, but we can teach them from any historical perspective that the facts support.
    5. I have seen the new sample test, and the only difference is that the questions address short passages from historical documents. The types of questions are identical to those in the past. The only difference is that the new test requires the students to analyze historical ideas instead of memorizing just historical facts.
    6. Please leave the teaching of history to the professionals. We know what we are doing better than Glenn Beck.
    7. Why not go tell surgeons which tools they should use?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>