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UK universities warn of exodus by EU academics post-Brexit

Nov 13, 2017 by

One-third of languages and economics teaching staff are from EU, who need more clarity about their status, says British Academy study

The potential risk to UK universities from post-Brexit academic flight has been laid bare in a report that reveals there are regions where up to half of academic staff in some departments are EU nationals.

The British Academy report [pdf] warns that economics and modern language departments will be particularly badly hit if European academics leave the UK, with more than a third of staff in each discipline currently from EU member states.

The risk is particularly acute in Northern Ireland where a quarter of all academic staff – across all subjects – are from EU countries, while in the West Midlands almost half of modern languages staff are from the EU.

British universities have warned the government they risk losing talented EU staff who need greater clarity on their post-Brexit rights if they are to commit to remain in the UK.

Now the British Academy, which is the public voice for the humanities and social sciences, has named the subjects most at risk as a result of the continuing uncertainty over immigration rules after Brexit.

Top of the “at risk” list are economics and modern languages, with 36% of economists and 35% of academics in modern language departments from EU countries. Next are mathematics (29%), physics (28%), classics and chemical engineering (26%) and politics and international relations (25%).

The report, Brexit Means … ?, warns that the humanities and social sciences will be particularly hard hit by any detrimental change to immigration rules post-Brexit. Six out of the top 10 “at risk” subjects with the highest proportions of non-UK EU staff are in the humanities and social sciences.

Source: UK universities warn of exodus by EU academics post-Brexit | Education | The Guardian

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