The achievement gap grew starkly under California’s new Common Core tests.

Oct 2, 2015 by

UFV_MATH_CONTEST

About 970 of the 1,000 California schools performing best on new math tests also had a lower proportion of students classified as “economically disadvantaged” than the statewide average.

More than just the income disparity between the poor and the wealthy has grown in California; lately, the test score gap between the haves and have-nots has gotten wider, too.

About 350 large California schools aced new Common Core tests, with more than three quarters of their students meeting new math standards.

But just 6 of those schools also had a higher proportion of students classified as “economically disadvantaged” than the statewide average. In other words, 98 percent of the state’s highest-performing schools on the new math test had a relatively low proportion of students in poverty.

The test score achievement gap between wealthy and poor students is much larger under California’s new Common Core tests than the gap was under older tests.

About 21 percent of “economically-disadvantaged” students met new math standards, compared to 53 percent of students not classified as economically disadvantaged.

Source: The achievement gap grew starkly under California’s new Common Core tests. See it in your community. | The Sacramento Bee

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