Atheist target homeschool Bible study for kids; threaten to sue churches for participating

Dec 25, 2019 by

Not satisfied with shutting down public displays of prayer and worship, angry atheists have reportedly taken this Christmas to also targeting Christian homeschooling programs.

And according to reports, their efforts have in some cases been successful …

One particular homeschooling program, Classical Conversations, empowers parents with the training and resources needed to homeschool their children in a “classical, Christian” manner devoid of left-wing politics.

Suffice it to say, when children who are exposed to Classical Conversations are taught about math, English, logic and other key topics, they’re not inundated with a bunch of other extemporaneous left-wing nonsense about “social justice.”

Learn more about the program below:

Naturally, some churches have partnered with Classical Conversations, which is a privately held company, to spread the word and reach parents who seek to homeschool their kids. But in doing so, they’ve attracted the attention of perpetually angry atheists.

Speaking recently with Jenni White, the education director of Reclaim Oklahoma Parent Empowerment, the program’s CEO, Robert Bortins, revealed that over 2,500 participating churches have over the past year received one of two threatening letters from said atheists.

“The first letter attempted an informational tone and contained internet addresses for a number of articles referencing ways various states regulate interactions between churches and for-profit businesses,” White reported last week.

“A second letter sent several months later took a more strident tone. It identified the writers as ‘a group of Christian parents who are very concerned about the business practices of this company’ and was accompanied by a ‘comprehensive list of issues that former Classical Conversations families have compiled.’”

The so-called “issues” included complaints about the program’s so-called “culture,” complaints about Bortins’ personal political opinions, complaints about the program’s price, complaints about the program’s teaching methodology, etc.

Nearly every aspect of the program was deemed problematic in one fashion or another. And the underlying threat was clear: Unless the church in question promptly disassociated itself from the problematic program, the activists would file suit.

Because God forbid children be taught about, say, the Socratic method, versus about how America’s duly elected president is apparently a racist:

Sadly, in some cases the threats worked …

“After receiving these letters, some church leaders have chosen to close their doors to CC programs they’ve hosted, in some cases for years, stranding enrolled homeschooling families,” White confirmed

“[I]t’s obvious some churches will kowtow to a tiny minority of cranks rather than accept legal assistance to stand against unreasonable and unsubstantiated interpretations of government regulations — an altogether too common story today,” she added.

And to be clear, legal assistance is indeed available.

Classical Conversations has reportedly allied itself with the Alliance Defending Freedom, a firehouse Christian legal nonprofit that’s played a pivotal role this past decade in defending persecuted Christian families and institutions.

The ADF has in recent times been especially active in combating transgender bathroom policies that endanger the safety and well-being of young boys and girls.

Some churches that initially distanced themselves from Classical Conversations have since re-embraced the program after being offered legal help and more information.

Others, however, have chosen to stay away, much to White’s chagrin.

“Although it may seem easier to church leaders to cave to outside pressure and allow crybabies to dictate church policy in the short term, one of the few things standing between absolute tyranny and freedom in America today is the church’s ability to provide religious training in all forms,” she lamented.

“In the words of one California pastor, ‘What right does the state have to tell the church what is and what is not worship? You are not theologians or interpreters of Scripture. Worship isn’t just singing and listening to a sermon. Every act of obedience to God is an act of worship. We are told in the Bible that it is our responsibility to educate our children, and therefore education is an act of worship and does not violate any property usage understanding.’”

Members of the far-left disagree and have made it exceedingly clear they believe every aspect of the American people’s lives must be controlled and regulated for the greater good, including how they choose to raise and educate their children.

Like radical liberal Democrat and former MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry said in 2013, “[W]e have to break through our kind of private idea that kids belong to their parents or kids belong to their families, and recognize that kids belong to whole communities.

“We have never invested as much in public education as we should have because we’ve always had kind of a private notion of children: your kid is yours and totally your responsibility. We haven’t had a very collective notion of these are our children,” she added.

Listen:

After the ad went viral and sparked backlash, Harris-Perry tried to walk back it back.

“Those of you who were alarmed by the ad can relax,” she reportedly wrote. “I have no designs on taking your children. Please keep your kids! I venture to say that anyone and everyone should know full well that my message in that ad was a call to see ourselves as connected to a larger whole. I don’t want your kids, but I want them to live in safe neighborhoods. I want them to learn in enriching and dynamic classrooms. I want them to be healthy and well and free from fear.”

Maybe she was telling the truth. The problem is that her side of the political/ideological aisle hasn’t stuck to this truth. Instead, it’s increased its efforts to dictate how all Americans raise their children — and that ought to be a concern to all parents, not just those interested in providing their children with a “classical, Christian”-based education.

Source: Atheist target homeschool Bible study for kids; threaten to sue churches for participating

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2 Comments

  1. Avatar
    Dawn

    How different is CC from wedding planners, funeral directors & other small businesses such as florists & caterers which often operate in church buildings?
    Why pick on education?

  2. Avatar
    QiPo

    When you hate life, hate yourself, your neighbors, your community, your country, and God, you look for trouble. If you look for trouble, you’ll find it. I thank God we homeschooled.

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