Best and worst education news of 2013

Nov 30, 2013 by

By Larry Ferlazzo –

It’s time again for an annual recap of education news. As usual, I don’t presume to say it’s all-encompassing, so I hope you’ll take time to share your own choices. I’ll list the ones I think are the best first, followed by the worst. It’s too hard to rank them within those categories, so I’m not listing them in any order.

The Best Education News Of 2013 — So Far:

*A number of states have decided to delay — in one form or another – their use of the next generation of tests geared towards Common Core Standards. One can only help that this is just the first of many steps they will be taking towards recognizing the shortcomings of these kinds of assessments and their misuse for accountability purposes.

* The successful boycott of the unnecessary MAP standardized test by teachers at Garfield High School in Seattle that spread to six other local schools and inspired educators everywhere. Teachers who participated in the boycott were not disciplined (as had been threatened) and using the MAP tests have now been made optional. Garfield teachers’ strategy of organizing a united front of teachers, parents and students demonstrated that collective action can have a major impact on education policy that affects our classrooms.

* Passage and approval of California Gov. Jerry Brown’s new funding formula that not only increases school funding across the board, but provides more monies to districts with higher numbers of low-income students. We can only hope that it will be a model for other states to follow.

* The deaths of children (and adults) as a result of the terrifying Oklahoma tornado will never be considered anything but awful news. But the heroic response of local educators risking their own lives to save their students is another reminder that teachers do put the interests of children ahead of their own.

via Best and worst education news of 2013.

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