He’s getting into college without the help of wealth and privilege — and it’s hard work

Mar 22, 2019 by

On the mantel in a South Los Angeles home, the lovingly arranged keepsakes reflect a family’s pride.

Damion Lester Jr. smiles broadly in his senior class portrait, decked out in the blue cap and gown of nearby George Washington Preparatory High School. His certificate of high honors for his A grades is nestled near his football awards and homecoming king crown.

Image result for George Washington Preparatory High School photos

The achievements have impressed colleges, and the first offers of admission have come in: UC Davis and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas so far, with word from his top choices, UCLA and USC, still to come.

Damion, 18, is getting into college without the advantages of privilege or wealth.

His daily reality is worlds away from those described in the college admissions scandal, in which wealthy parents allegedly paid to fake and bribe their children’s way into top universities.

Damion lives with his grandparents near Watts in Vermont Vista, which ranks third in violent crime among more than 200 L.A. neighborhoods mapped by The Times. The median household income in the predominantly black and Latino neighborhood is $31,000. Only 6% of adults have four-year college degrees.

continue: He’s getting into college without the help of wealth and privilege — and it’s hard work – Los Angeles Times

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.