Hong Kong’s largest international school group reviewing curriculum to ‘make sure everybody is safe’ after national security law’s passage

Aug 31, 2020 by

English Schools Foundation head acknowledges schools operate ‘within the law of the land’, but maintains students will still be encouraged to think critically.

  • English Schools Foundation head acknowledges schools operate ‘within the law of the land’, but maintains students will still be encouraged to think critically
  • ‘At this point in time’ curriculum will continue as is, she adds
Belinda Greer, head of English Schools Foundation, acknowledges schools operate ‘within the law of the land’, but maintains students will still be encouraged to think critically. Photo: May Tse
Belinda Greer, head of English Schools Foundation, acknowledges schools operate ‘within the law of the land’, but maintains students will still be encouraged to think critically. Photo: May Tse
Hong Kong’s biggest international school group is looking at its secondary curriculum to ensure staff “feel safe” teaching in their usual way following the imposition of the sweeping

national security law

, according to its chief executive.

The head of the

English Schools Foundation

(ESF), Belinda Greer, also said neutrality would be maintained when the law was touched on in class, and teachers would continue to encourage students to think critically.

The law, which came into effect on June 30 and carries a penalty of up to life imprisonment, targets acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign forces. The government is also required to promote national security education in schools, which have been told to remove from libraries books that may be in breach of the law.

An Education Bureau spokeswoman did not comment on whether changes would have to be made at international schools, but said guidelines would soon be issued to schools on how they might review their curriculum and teaching under the new law.

What you should know about China’s new national security law for Hong Kong

The bureau earlier issued guidelines to all schools after the national anthem law took effect on June 12, advising them to call police if there were serious and deliberate cases of students or teachers disrespecting March of the Volunteers.

The anthem law and guidelines require teachers and students to “stand solemnly and deport themselves with dignity” while the Chinese national and Hong Kong flags are being raised and the song is being played.

In an interview with the Post, Greer said principals at ESF secondary schools had already been looking at the curriculum following the implementation of the new laws, while focusing on the continuity of pupils’ learning and “making sure that everybody is safe”.

Source: Hong Kong’s largest international school group reviewing curriculum to ‘make sure everybody is safe’ after national security law’s passage | South China Morning Post

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