Hundreds of non-recyclable fiberglass wind turbine blades are pictured piling up in landfill

May 6, 2020 by

The municipal landfill in Casper, Wyoming, is the repository of at least 870 discarded blades, and one of the few locations in the country that accepts the massive fiberglass objects.

The turbine landfill in Casper is so big that it can be seen from space, as seen in this satellite image

  • Indestructible wind turbine blades can’t easily be crushed, recycled or repurposed
  • Instead they are hacked into pieces small enough for a flatbed and hauled to landfills 
  • The municipal landfill in Casper, Wyoming, is the final resting place of 870 blades
  • Other landfill that accept the blades are in Lake Mills, Iowa and Sioux Falls, South Dakota 

Incredible photos have revealed the final resting place of massive wind turbine blades that cannot be recycled, and are instead heaped up in piles in landfills.

The municipal landfill in Casper, Wyoming, is the repository of at least 870 discarded blades, and one of the few locations in the country that accepts the massive fiberglass objects.

Built to withstand hurricane winds, the turbine blades cannot easily be crushed or recycled. About 8,000 of the blades are decommissioned in the U.S. every year.

Once they reach the end of their useful life on electricity-generating wind turbines, the blades have to be hacked up with industrial saws into pieces small enough to fit on a flat-bed trailer and hauled to a landfill that accepts them.

Pieces of wind turbine blades are buried in the Casper Regional Landfill in Casper, Wyoming. Around 8,000 wind turbine blades will need to be removed and disposed of every year in the United States alone

The blades, some of which are as long as a football field, have to be hacked up to fit on trucks for transport to landfills

The Casper Regional Landfill in Wyoming is one of a few places in the nation to dispose of used wind turbine blade

In addition to the landfill in Casper, landfills in Lake Mills, Iowa and Sioux Falls, South Dakota accept the discarded blades – but few other facilities have the kind of open space needed to bury the massive blades.

Once they are in the ground, the blades will remain there essentially forever – they do not degrade or break down over time.

‘The wind turbine blade will be there, ultimately, forever,’ Bob Cappadona, chief operating officer for the North American unit of Paris-based Veolia Environnement SA, told Bloomberg in February.

Veolia is searching for better ways to deal with the massive waste generated by the discarded blades.

‘Most landfills are considered a dry tomb,’ Cappadona said. ‘The last thing we want to do is create even more environmental challenges.’

Source: Hundreds of non-recyclable fiberglass wind turbine blades are pictured piling up in landfill | Daily Mail Online

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