Parents change college finance strategy

Jul 24, 2013 by

WASHINGTON — College costs are driving decisions about which schools to attend, what to study and even where to live, according to a report from loan giant Sallie Mae.

Parents no longer foot the largest portion of the bill, according to the lender’s annual survey. That role goes to grants and scholarships, with student loans coming in third.

While the recession has largely passed, economic worries have not, and many families are making college choices driven by fears of tuition hikes and job losses, according to the survey.

“Parents are willing to stretch themselves,” said Sarah Ducich, Sallie Mae’s senior vice president for public policy. “It’s not that they’re not willing to pay; it’s that their income is not keeping up.”

College spending per student was about $21,000 during 2012, down from a peak of $24,000 in 2010, according to the Sallie Mae-Ipsos Public Affairs report.

The annual survey of student financial aid found students earned about $6,300 in grants and scholarships to pay for college costs in 2012, taking the top spots from parents.


Parents chipped in $5,727 on average, a decrease of 35 percent since 2010.

Student loans were the third-most-common source to pick up the bill for courses, housing and books. The average student borrowed $8,815 in federal loans.

The rate for those loans was the subject of debate in the Senate last week, as lawmakers considered a compromise that would offer some students lower rates for the next few years, but would prescribe higher rates for future classes.

The White House on Tuesday released a statement urging swift passage of the deal, negotiated over the last few weeks by Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Richard Burr, R-N.C. Under the deal, interest rates would be linked to the financial markets. Interest rates on subsidized Stafford loans doubled to 6.8 percent July 1 because Congress did not act. Lawmakers say the rate is unacceptably high, but they differ on how best to restore them.

The Senate is set to consider the bipartisan fix today. It would overhaul the entire federal student lending program.

via Parents change college finance strategy – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

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