Google Find us on Google+

Parents must teach children the difference between right and wrong

Apr 30, 2013 by

Tom Winsor says strategy would save money and reduce victims

Parents must not leave it to the police to teach their children the difference between right and wrong, the police watchdog said today.

Tom Winsor argued more had to be done to stop youngsters being drawn into a culture of crime, as he used a major speech to insist ‘prevention is far better than cure’.

Doctors, teachers and social workers were also accused of ‘abdicating’ their responsibility to deal with troublemakers in the major intervention by the new chief inspector of constabulary for England and Wales.

One the beat: Police watchdog Tom Winsor called for better-targeted patrols to ‘disrupt and destroy’ opportunities to offend, instead of waiting for crimes to happen

Mr Winsor called for a return to the founding principles of the police set out by Sir Robert Peel more than 180 years ago.

He said officers should spend more time on crime prevention to stop offences happening in the first place, and less focus on catching criminals.

 

But he insisted crime prevention is not the ‘sole obligation’ of the police and every part of society had to play a part.

In a speech to the RUSI think tank in London, he said: ‘Parents and families, as well as schools and other educational institutions, must instil in children a strong appreciation of right and wrong.

‘Parents and families… must instil in children a strong appreciation of right and wrong’

Tom Winsor

 

‘And the reality, instincts and inclinations, motivations and means, to behave as responsible, law-abiding citizens, and not to be drawn into disorder, crime or the circumstances which create.

‘And intensify the conditions in which crime is the easiest and most attractive option.’

Mental health professionals, judges, prison guards and probation officers also ‘have material
parts to play’ to ensure offenders receive the right sentences and punishments to keep reoffending ‘to the irreducible minimum,’ he added.

Mr Winsor also called for state bodies to work together better to prevent criminal behaviour escalating.

Mr Winsor said that predictions cuts in police budgets would lead to a rise in crime had been proved wrong

Mr Winsor said that predictions cuts in police budgets would lead to a rise in crime had been proved wrong

 

‘The quality of interaction and cooperation between the wider public and protective services, including social services, health and education, needs to be improved, with each service fully and properly discharging its responsibilities rather than abdicating duty in favour of the one public service which will never say no.’

 

He claims more effort to prevent crimes happening at all would save money ‘downstream’ by keeping would-be offenders out of the courts.

 

Earlier he argued that technology should be used by officers on the beat to track tagged criminals to ‘disrupt and destroy’ their chances of offending,  the new chief inspector of constabulary for England and Wales said.

He told BBC Radio 4: ‘The primary purpose of the police is to prevent crime taking place in the first place, it is to keep people safe. 

‘Sir Robert Peel, who founded the modern police service in 1829 said the primary test of police efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder.

‘Let’s remember that all the costs of the criminal justice system – and they are considerable – are incurred downstream of an offence being committed.

‘Prevention is far better than cure. If we can prevent offences taking place and we prevent there being any victims, which is absolutely critical, and also we save all of those costs.’

Police forces face budget cuts and will have to do more with less.

‘Prevention is far better than cure. If we can prevent offences, we prevent there being any victims’

Tom Winsor

But Mr Winsor said predictions that austerity would lead to a rise in crime had been ‘proved wrong’.

‘’While the budgets have been cut and cut quite considerably in some respects, crime has come down,’ he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

 

With budgets squeezed, forces should use new technology to reduce costs and target known troublemakers, he added.

‘Much better use of technology and intelligence… to know where the offenders are – those that are wearing tags and those who are just known to be the most prolific and persistent and dangerous offenders in the community – and take them off the streets or disrupt and destroy their opportunities to offend.’

He said the use of technology was ‘patchy’ with some forces dong better than others.

Mr Winsor argues that money can be saved if crimes can be prevented, eradicating the cost of dealing with offenders in the criminal justice system

Mr Winsor argues that money can be saved if crimes can be prevented, eradicating the cost of dealing with offenders in the criminal justice system

Steve White, vice-chairman of the Police Federation, said: ‘We agree with the principle that crime prevention should be at the heart of the service, indeed this is the cornerstone of traditional policing.

‘However, politicians and the public should be mindful of the fact that preventative policing is both resource-intensive and often very difficult to measure.

‘Falling budgets and an emphasis on statistics and targets have resulted in officers having less time to carry out proactive patrolling on our streets than at any point in the past. Now we must work with HMIC to establish how these ideas will be realised.’

David Hanson, Labour’s shadow policing minister, said:  ‘Preventing crime and making life difficult for persistent offenders follows the evidence of maintaining public safety. Yet the Government has cut the community safety budgets by an incredible 60 per cent.

The speech comes as an influential think-tank calls for forces to bring back the blue police boxes, which were phased out in the 1960s.

In a major report, Policy Exchange called for the return of the blue boxes, now better known as Doctor Who’s time-travelling Tardis, to save money and improve the service to the public.

It concludes that police stations, though popular with the public, are ‘out of date’ and should be replaced by both boxes and counters in shopping centres, post offices and elsewhere on the high street.

A modern version of the Tardis police box, made famous by Doctor Who, could be used as a base for patrolling officers, the Policy Exchange think tank said

A modern version of the Tardis police box, made famous by Doctor Who, could be used as a base for patrolling officers, the Policy Exchange think tank said

The report endorses the ‘possible introduction of a modern version of the Tardis police box, made famous by Doctor Who’.

It adds: ‘These would be technologically-enabled police contact points, featuring two-way audio-visual technology so the public could communicate directly with police.’

The boxes were commonplace from the 1920s to the 1960s, before the introduction of police radios.
Beat officers would be based around a box, which contained a phone.

A light on top of the box would flash to indicate to the officer they should contact the station.

Modern versions would allow the public to report crime and anti-social behaviour, get information and even give witness statements, the report said.

Crucially, they would allow the members of the public to contact officers even when their local police station had closed.

via Tom Winsor: Parents must teach children the difference between right and wrong not leave to police to pick up the pieces | Mail Online.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Related Posts

Tags

Share This

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

UA-24036587-1