Re: New York Times, November 20, 2011 November 22, 2011 Drugs Used for Psychotics Go to Youths in Foster Care

Nov 26, 2011 by

By Benedict Carey

There is so much wrong with this picture. “Foster kid” is not a medical diagnosis, not even a psychiatric diagnosis. But it identifies a vulnerable, sad, hopeless, population of children, uniformly failed by parents, families, communities and country, ripe for psychiatric diagnosis, the only purpose of which (ever) is to justify psychiatric drugging starting with one, escalating to 5, 6 or, not uncommonly—13 drugs (per child) with each succeeding drug to ‘treat’ the symptoms and signs (signs are real physical abnormalities) caused by the previous drug or drugs–there never having been a real disease in the first place. True—psychiatrists go to medical school and become physicians but entering psychiatry–their diagnoses, all begetting drugs, come straight out of their catalogue of psychiatric disorders—the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (as we await DSM-V, due out in ‘13) classifications of human emotions, pain, and disturbed behavior—none of them diseases/chemical imbalances as is sung to justify the unified response—a prescription or (soon) prescriptions for the latest sponsor of the psychiatry–now an ‘or perhaps the ‘thorax’ of that industry. Thus it is that these astounding poisons who’s adverse effects accounted for 10% of this neurologists practice (more, today I am sure) are being prescribed as if lifesaving to entirely normal children or anyone, regardless of age, who will accept a almost any one of their fanciful ‘disorder’ labels, and the prescriptions drug(s) and quarterly drug checks that will define the rest of their lives. Imagine, 4 year olds with Parkinson’s disease, tardive dyskinesias (usually permanent involuntary writhing & tics at times to the point of exhaustion), oculogyric (involuntary version of the eyes up, down or to the sides) crises or even sudden cardiac death such as is now emerging in our Iraq and Afghanistan soldiers and veterans courtesy of sell-outs in Central Command who have gotten who knows how much under the table to call Seroquel, an antipsychotic, a “sleep aid.” The question now is who among them is not on Seroquel. And now—‘foster’ children. How low will they sink? And it is not just psychiatrists.

FRED A. BAUGHMAN, JR. M.D.

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