Stanford study quietly published at NIH.gov proves face masks are absolutely worthless against Covid”

Apr 19, 2021 by

4.17.21 – American Conservative Movement

“Stanford study quietly published at NIH.gov proves face masks are absolutely worthless against Covid”

The diapers most of us are wearing on our face most of the time apparently have no effect at stopping Covid-19. This explains a lot.

By J. D. Rucker

Did you hear about the peer-reviewed study done by Stanford University that demonstrates beyond a reasonable doubt that face masks have absolutely zero chance of preventing the spread of Covid-19? No? It was posted on the the National Center for Biotechnological Information government website. The NCBI is a branch of the National Institute for Health, so one would think such a study would be widely reported by mainstream media and embraced by the “science-loving” folks in Big Tech.

Instead, a DuckDuckGo search reveals it was picked up by ZERO mainstream media outlets and Big Tech tyrants will suspend people who post it, as political strategist Steve Cortes learned the hard way when he posted a Tweet that went against the face mask narrative. The Tweet itself featured a quote and a link that prompted Twitter to suspend his account, potentially indefinitely.

He was quoting directly from the NCBI publication of the study. The government website he linked to features a peer-reviewed study by Stanford University’s Baruch Vainshelboim. In it, he cited 67 scholars, doctors, scientists, and other studies to support his conclusions.

The sentence Cortes quoted from the study’s conclusion reads: “The data suggest that both medical and non-medical facemasks are ineffective to block human-to-human transmission of viral and infectious disease such SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, supporting against the usage of facemasks.”

Twitter messaged Cortes demanding he delete the Tweet, citing that he broke Twitter rules specifically for, “Violating the policy on spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.”

Vainshelboim drew many conclusions from the vast information he compiled, but arguably the biggest bombshell in it can be found in the “Efficacy of facemasks” section [emphasis added]:

{According to the current knowledge, the virus SARS-CoV-2 has a diameter of 60 nm to 140 nm [nanometers (billionth of a meter)] [16], [17], while medical and non-medical facemasks’ thread diameter ranges from 55 µm to 440 µm [micrometers (one millionth of a meter), which is more than 1000 times larger [25]. Due to the difference in sizes between SARS-CoV-2 diameter and facemasks thread diameter (the virus is 1000 times smaller), SARS-CoV-2 can easily pass through any facemask.}

This study isn’t the only one out there that demonstrates scientifically the inefficacy and dangers associated with constant use of face masks. One would think that considering the source, this type of information would be acceptable to even Big Tech tyrants. After all, they constantly chide us about following the science. Well, here’s the science.

Leaders in Democrat-led states should rejoice at this information since it explains why their Covid case numbers keep going up despite their ongoing lockdowns while Republican-led states are doing better. The real science gives them the answer that Dr. Anthony Fauci fails to grasp.

We’re posting the study for posterity; one never knows when the government or their puppetmasters in Silicon Valley will determine it needs to come down:

==================================

Med Hypotheses. 2021 Jan; 146: 110411.

Published online 2020 Nov 22. doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2020.110411

PMCID: PMC7680614

PMID: 33303303

“Facemasks in the COVID-19 era: A health hypothesis”

Baruch Vainshelboim

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680614/

CONCLUSION:

The existing scientific evidences challenge the safety and efficacy of wearing facemask as preventive intervention for COVID-19. The data suggest that both medical and non-medical facemasks are ineffective to block human-to-human transmission of viral and infectious disease such SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, supporting against the usage of facemasks. Wearing facemasks has been demonstrated to have substantial adverse physiological and psychological effects. These include hypoxia, hypercapnia, shortness of breath, increased acidity and toxicity, activation of fear and stress response, rise in stress hormones, immunosuppression, fatigue, headaches, decline in cognitive performance, predisposition for viral and infectious illnesses, chronic stress, anxiety and depression. Long-term consequences of wearing facemask can cause health deterioration, developing and progression of chronic diseases and premature death. Governments, policy makers and health organizations should utilize prosper and scientific evidence-based approach with respect to wearing facemasks, when the latter is considered as preventive intervention for public health.

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23 Comments

  1. JT

    The Baruch Vainshelboim article has been retracted for cause:
    See: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8114149/

    “This retracts the article “Facemasks in the COVID-19 era: A health hypothesis” in Med Hypotheses, volume 146 on page 110411.

    “This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal [at:](https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal).

    “This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief.

    “Medical Hypotheses serves as a forum for innovative and often disruptive ideas in medicine and related biomedical sciences. However, our strict editorial policy is that we do not publish misleading or inaccurate citations to advance any hypotheses.

    “The Editorial Committee concluded that the author’s hypothesis is misleading on the following basis:

    “1. A broader review of existing scientific evidence clearly shows that approved masks with correct certification, and worn in compliance with guidelines, are an effective prevention of COVID-19 transmission.

    “2. The manuscript misquotes and selectively cites published papers. References #16, 17, 25 and 26 are all misquoted.

    “3. Table 1. Physiological and Psychological Effects of Wearing Facemask and Their Potential Health Consequences, generated by the author. All data in the table is unverified, and there are several speculative statements.

    “4. The author submitted that he is currently affiliated to Stanford University, and VA Palo Alto Health Care System. However, both institutions have confirmed that Dr Vainshelboim ended his connection with them in 2016.

    “A subsequent internal investigation by the Editor-in-Chief and the Publisher have determined that this article was externally peer reviewed but not with our customary standards of rigor prior to publication. The journal has re-designed its editorial and review workflow to ensure that this will not happen again in future.

    “The Editor-in-Chief and the Publisher would like to apologize to the readers of The Journal for difficulties this
    issue has caused.”

  2. Bill

    AS of 5/1/2021 the article has been removed from PubMed and the NIH website

  3. Jamie

    All I can say is ” I was hammered after posting it on a hikers forum” sadly many didn’t read past a few paragraphs, some did but didn’t read any of the many references backing the paper up. Ugh my
    Who asked me to join the forum, must he got into a fight already. Lol

  4. THEKGB

    So many “people” who’s agenda is to continue the crap.
    Notice their fear and aggression to a peer reviewed paper?
    These are, for lack of a better word, the “enemy” of truth.
    It’s sad that they’re everywhere pushing their scam.

  5. Kari

    The Author is a fraud. He is not affiliated with Stanford or The Palo Alto VA. https://apnews.com/article/fact-checking-629043235973

    • Read and Weep!
      Baruch Vainshelboim⁎

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680614/

      Author Information:

      Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States

      ⁎Address: VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Cardiology 111C, 3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, United States.

      ==================

      Author Notes:

      Received 2020 Oct 4; Revised 2020 Oct 28; Accepted 2020 Nov 19.

      ======================

      Copyright and License Information:

      Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

      Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company’s public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre – including this research content – immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

      ========================

      THE ARTICLE HAS EXTENSIVE REFERENCES THAT APPEAR TO BE CREDIBLE SOURCES (SEE END OF THE ARTICLE) — https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680614/

      ====================================

      BARUCH VAINSHELBOIM — PUBLICATIONS

      https://bmcpulmmed.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12890-019-1015-3.pdf

      =====================

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Vainshelboim%20B%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=33303303

      ======================

      https://books.ersjournals.com/author/Vainshelboim%2CBaruch

      ===========================

      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987720333028?via%3Dihub&fbclid=IwAR1NWwC455hKlLj-AFXSBg0QI7ASouaDX5WVfkaFArbc1TiPV0RIRlir7VI

      [Baruch Vainshelboim

      View in Scopus

      Address: VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Cardiology 111C, 3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, United States.

      baruch.v1981@gmail.com

      Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States]

      =========================

      https://www.howardnema.com/2021/04/11/long-term-health-consequences-of-wearing-face-masks/

      ==========================

      These are the 67 references used by Dr. Baruch Vainshelboim in his article. Could they all be wrong?

      References

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    • James Charles Noyes

      I am generally able to scrape a more intelligent comment from the bottom of my shoe. Okay genius, let’s lay aside the above debate for a moment. Would you be so kind as to cite the double-blind, peer reviewed, repeatable studies that clearly demonstrate the efficacy of ANY form of face covering in preventing the spread of a virus – Cv-19 included? Waiting….. Waiting…. Still waiting…… I didn’t think so. So who is the charlitan here? The author or yourself? Hmm.

    • Kevin

      No, Dr. Vainshelboim is not a fraud! He is a very intelligent Israeli doctor, and his report is spot on. He confirmed everything that I knew about facemasks and more. No thinking person could possibly believe that a cloth mask could filter out a .1 micron virus, and Dr. Vainshelboim gave us the evidence to prove it! Stop drinking the Fauci Kool-aid!

  6. Michael J Raley

    Peer reviewed is mentioned above

    “The government website he linked to features a peer-reviewed study by Stanford University’s Baruch Vainshelboim. In it, he cited 67 scholars, doctors, scientists, and other studies to support his conclusions”

    • Liambada

      It’s not a study, it’s a meta-analysis these are very different things.

      Secondly it’s just one mans unproven hypothesis FFS!

      • Kareem

        Oh, you said…. META ANALYSIS…. LOL… this is the new buzz word from the left who always proclaim to “believe the science” when they pick the science that THEY agree with. If they don’t agree with it, they call it a “meta analysis”.

    • JT

      Read the Snopes article which explains the different ways it’s false and how it’s on the NIH website and how the author is not associated with Stanford nor the VA Palo Alto Health Care System.

      https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/stanford-nih-mask-study/

      • The leftest paid useful idiots at Snopes trying their best to discredit folks.
        Baruch Vainshelboim⁎

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680614/

        Author Information:

        Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States

        ⁎Address: VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Cardiology 111C, 3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, United States.

        ==================

        Author Notes:

        Received 2020 Oct 4; Revised 2020 Oct 28; Accepted 2020 Nov 19.

        ======================

        Copyright and License Information:

        Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

        Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company’s public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre – including this research content – immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

        ========================

        THE ARTICLE HAS EXTENSIVE REFERENCES THAT APPEAR TO BE CREDIBLE SOURCES (SEE END OF THE ARTICLE) — https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680614/

        ====================================

        BARUCH VAINSHELBOIM — PUBLICATIONS

        https://bmcpulmmed.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12890-019-1015-3.pdf

        =====================

        https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Vainshelboim%20B%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=33303303

        ======================

        https://books.ersjournals.com/author/Vainshelboim%2CBaruch

        ===========================

        https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987720333028?via%3Dihub&fbclid=IwAR1NWwC455hKlLj-AFXSBg0QI7ASouaDX5WVfkaFArbc1TiPV0RIRlir7VI

        [Baruch Vainshelboim

        View in Scopus

        Address: VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Cardiology 111C, 3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, United States.

        baruch.v1981@gmail.com

        Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States]

        =========================

        https://www.howardnema.com/2021/04/11/long-term-health-consequences-of-wearing-face-masks/

        ==========================

        These are the 67 references used by Dr. Baruch Vainshelboim in his article. Could they all be wrong?

        References

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      • Kareem

        Oh, he said…. META ANALYSIS…. LOL… this is the new buzz word from the left who always proclaim to “believe the science” when they pick the science that THEY agree with. If they don’t agree with it, they call it a “meta analysis”.

      • Kareem

        Snopes. Hahahaha… most people don’t give snopes or any of the so called ‘fact checkers’ any credibility.

      • James Charles Noyes

        Snopes – the ever reliable and final authority on life, the universe and everything.

        • James Charles Noyes

          Snopes – the “go to” source for all liars, obfuscators and useful idiots.

  7. I have shared the study with family members, one of whom is a “medical researcher” whom allude to the fact that this was not peer reviewed, is there something I can point to in order to correct her? Or how can I tell if this was peer reviewed?

    • BE

      Peer review is basically BS!! All it means is other members of the club have voted on whether they like it or not!!! It’s a way to keep out-of-the-box thinkers…in the box!!!

    • JZ

      Your family member is incorrect, it is peer reviewed.

    • Todd M

      Why would it be published on the NCBI government website if it wasn’t credible?

    • Gregory Butner

      Well the article in the first line claims that it is peer reviewed. I would assume that the NCBI has a peer review process before publishing.

    • JT

      Read the Aims & scope, at the Journal’s web site: https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/medical-hypotheses/about/aims-and-scope

      Copied from that page: Submitted manuscripts will be reviewed by the Editor and external reviewers to ensure their scientific merit. All reviewers will be fully aware of the Aims and Scope of the Journal and will be judging the premise, originality and plausibility of the hypotheses submitted.

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