Statue of Molech, Pagan Deity of Child Sacrifice, Displayed at Colosseum

Nov 14, 2019 by

The statue on display at the Roman Colosseum is similar to this depiction of the pagan deity Moloch from the National Cinema Museum in Turin, Italy. | Wikimedia Commons/Jean-Pierre Dalbéra
The statue on display at the Roman Colosseum is similar to this depiction of the pagan deity Moloch from the National Cinema Museum in Turin, Italy. | Wikimedia Commons/Jean-Pierre Dalbéra

ANALYSIS

Call it an odd juxtaposition, or a paean to the bloody pagan practices of two warring cities, ancient Rome and its ancient Mediterranean rival, Carthage.  From now through March 2020, as part of an exhibit celebrating the city of Carthage, a giant statue of Molech, the god of the ancient Canaanites and Carthaginians, will greet visitors at the entrance to the Roman Colosseum.

Molech is the pagan god who required his devotees to toss their children into his fiery belly as an act of worship. The location of the display is particularly worth noting since the Roman Colosseum is where many early Christians were slaughtered at the hands of lunatic dictators fearful of a faith they could not stop.

Previously, the Catholic Church had made the Colosseum a sacred site to honor these first Christians martyred for their faith, even placing Stations of the Cross there for the faithful to contemplate their sacrifice. Now it’s guarded by the pagan god Molech, whose demand for child sacrifice has been compared to the modern epidemic of abortion, and the faithful are greeted with a statue honoring a pagan deity whose murderous spirit still seeks to kill children.

LifeSite News reports it is not a welcome sight for some Christian pilgrims. “We were so excited the day we decided to go to the Colosseum,” Alexandra Clark told the outlet via email. “But the moment we got there the sight that greeted us was horrifying! Standing guard over the entrance was the colossal pagan statue of Moloch. It was placed in that prime spot so that everyone that entered into the Colosseum had to pass it,” she continued. For Clark, it was “a mockery” of the martyrdom of those early Christians.

The name for this pagan god is often spelled Molech in the Bible, but other cultures also use the spelling Moloch. According to LifeSite, the statue of Moloch that’s been placed at the Colosseum is modeled on one found in the 1914 Italian silent film Cabiria. In the film, the idol of Moloch, set up in a Carthaginian temple, has a giant bronze furnace in his chest, into which hundreds of children are thrown. Cabiria, the heroine of the film, is threatened with this fiery fate.

Ancient Greek historians record that burning children alive as an offering was a common practice in Carthage. The Carthaginians “called the deity Baal and Cronus or Saturn, the Roman god who, according to myth, ate his own children lest they supplant him.”

Molech is also mentioned several times in the Book of Leviticus, where child sacrifice is strictly forbidden

continue: Statue of Molech, Pagan Deity of Child Sacrifice, Displayed at Colosseum | CBN News

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