TED CRUZ ON COMMON CORE — CNN DEBATE

Mar 11, 2016 by

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3.11.16 – CNN Debate – Ted Cruz on Common Core

In the CNN Debate last night, Ted Cruz was asked about his views on Common Core.  This is what he said: 

The Obama administration has abused executive power in forcing Common Core on the states. It has used Race-to-the-Top funds to effectively blackmail and force the states to adopt Common Core.

Now, the one silver lining of Obama abusing executive power is that everything done with executive power can be undone with executive power, and I intend to do that.

“Beyond that, though, Jake, I intend to work to abolish the federal Department of Education and send education back to the states and back to the local governments,” he added.

Donald Trump’s answer in the CNN debate was to glorify charters and to say that he had recently turned to Ben Carson for advice on education issues.  Ben Carson is a great doctor; but I personally do not think he is an expert on education issues, particularly those concerning the public schools.  

 

On the other hand, Ted Cruz has had a well-devised education plan on his website for many months:

 

 

Jan. 2016

“TED CRUZ – FIVE FOR FREEDOM”

https://www.tedcruz.org/five-for-freedom/

Department of Education

Educational opportunity thrives on choice, ingenuity, and diversity; the Department of Education squelches all three. Largely created as an outgrowth of Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society, the Department of Education has existed in its current form since 1980. Despite its stated aim to bring equal access to all, it has failed to close the gap between low-income communities and other communities, and instead has led to one-size-fits-all solutions imposed on millions of students with differing educational needs.

Eliminating the Department of Education not only restores the states’ constitutional power and saves taxpayers billions of dollars, it returns decision-making to parents and local communities, and liberates students and teachers from a failed top-down approach. The growing federal role in education spurred by the Education Department has led to perverse mandates such as Common Core and counterproductive laws such as No Child Left Behind.

We should repeal every word of Common Core. And, as President, I will direct the Secretary of Education to immediately end the federal government’s mandates that seek to force states to adopt this failed attempt at a universal curriculum.

Even more broadly, we need to get the federal government out of education altogether. The Department of Education has the third largest discretionary budget in the federal government, and it provides 10 percent of funding for K-12education.

Yet, with that 10 percent share, it imposes significant requirements on states and schools, forcing them to submit to federal bureaucrats. Education has traditionally been a state matter; the people closest to students know them best – parents and teachers know far more than Washington bureaucrats – and we are already witnessing remarkable reforms by state and local governments to increase school choice and resist Common Core standards. We need to restore parent and student choice and remove federal barriers to children’s success.

A Cruz Administration will eliminate the programs in the Department of Education that are wasteful, ineffective, and fail to achieve better student outcomes. We will perform a careful review of remaining programs to assess how best to return those responsibilities to state and local communities.

The lion’s share of K-12 funding will be block granted to the states, including Title I funding and the Individuals with Disabilities Education program, while the Indian Education program and Federal Impact Aid will be transferred to existing departments. Pell Grants will also remain intact and can be transferred to the Treasury Department. This will result in higher quality education, more tailored to local needs, at a lower cost.

The D.C. Public School Funding and the Opportunity Scholarship Program will persist because Washington D.C. is under the federal purview of Congress and it is constitutionally appropriate for those programs to continue to be overseen at a federal level. But those programs can be run by another department, and the Education Department can be shut down.

Ineffective Spending:

  • Since the Department’s inception in 1980, the federal government has spent nearly $1.5 trillion on education.

 

  • It cost the U.S. $151,000 per student to put the graduating class of 2009 through public school; adjusted for inflation, that is nearly three times the amount we spent on the graduating class of 1970.

 

  • Despite this outrageous spending, education outcomes have either stagnated or declined. The nation’s report card, first administered in 1992, shows that the disparity between white and black 12th grade reading scores has increased – showing African American students half a grade further behind their peers, and totaling a nearly three grade-level difference.

 

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3.8.16 — “Cruz or Trump on Education Issues?” — By Donna Garner – EdViews.org

http://www.educationviews.org/cruz-trump-education-issues/

 

 

Donna Garner

Wgarner1@hot.rr.com

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