TEXAS A&M STUDENT SENATE VOTED THE RIGHT WAY ON RELIGIOUS FUNDING EXEMPTION BILL

Apr 6, 2013 by

texas a&mSubject: TEXAS A&M STUDENT SENATE VOTED CORRECTLY ON RELIGIOUS FUNDING EXEMPTION BILL – AAS – 4.5.13

 

[4.5.13 — The ever-liberal Austin American Statesman is downcast over the fabulous vote by the Texas A&M Student Senate (35 – 28) this last Wednesday to keep their student fees from paying for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center.  The reason the students came up with the bill called the Religious Funding Exemption Bill is that when they asked for a traditional values center to balance out the LGBT Resource Center, their request was denied.

 

The Student Body president John Claybrook should be ashamed of himself for vetoing the bill.  The Senate will vote on whether to override Claybrook’s veto on April 17.  Aggie alumni should do whatever they can to encourage the Student Senate to override the veto.  —  Donna Garner]

 

http://www.statesman.com/news/news/local-education/texas-am-student-president-says-religious-funding-/nXDbx/

 

Posted: 12:11 p.m. Friday, April 5, 2013

Student leader: Funding exemption bill sullies A&M’s reputation

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By Ciara O’Rourke

American-Statesman Staff

 

Excerpts from this article:

 

Texas A&M University’s student body president is trying to tamp down controversy surrounding a proposal to allow students to request that a portion of their tuition or fees not be used to pay for aGay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Resource Center.

Texas A&M student body president John Claybrook

 

Saying the effort has damaged the school’s reputation, student body president John Claybrook vetoed a bill Friday that the student senate passed this week asking that students be allowed to opt out of funding services to which they object for religious reasons.

 

The senate voted 35-28 in favor of the Religious Funding Exemption Bill on Wednesday, asking the university to refund students their tuition or fees used for services to which they object.

 

In the measure formerly called the GLBT Funding Opt-Out Bill, language saying that many students disagree with the use of student fee and tuition money to pay for the resource center for religious reasons was changed to say that many students disagree with using that money to pay for “a number of services.”

 

…The senate is expected to vote on whether to override the veto on April 17, Claybrook said. To override, two-thirds of the student lawmakers would need to support it, he said. But even if the senate overrides the veto, the university administration would still have to approve the policy request.

 

…The Human Rights Campaign [largest homosexual organization in the U. S.] praised Claybrook’s decision in a news release Friday.

 

Students currently can’t opt out of paying fees, Claybrook said in the letter, though there is a process that considers appeals related to the university’s student fiscal policy.

 

Sherylon Carroll, the university’s associate vice president for communications, said in an email that A&M has a well-established appeal process for fees to effectively address “extraordinary situations” out of a student’s control, such as a crisis or major accident or illness. “Not because of a student’s religious beliefs,” she said…

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