Which U.S. president appointed all of the Supreme Court justices to place U.S. citizens into detention camps?

Apr 30, 2020 by

Which U.S. president appointed all of the Supreme Court justices who ruled that the federal government could place U.S. citizens of Japanese descent into detention camps without evidence of “individual disloyalty” to the U.S. during World War II?

Correct Answer
Franklin Delano Roosevelt

In the 1944 case of Korematsu v. United States, all six of the justices who ruled that the federal government could place U.S. citizens of Japanese descent into detention camps were appointed by Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Two of the dissenting justices were also appointed by Roosevelt, and one of the dissenting justices was appointed by Republican Herbert Hoover. As a result of this Roosevelt administration policy, 110,000 people of Japanese descent, including 70,000 who were born in the United States, were detained in camps with barbed wire fences and armed guards. They were allowed to take limited belongings with them, and some lost everything they owned. Nonetheless, during WWII, a group of Americans of Japanese descent became the most decorated military unit of its size in the history of the United States. Members of this unit were awarded 9,486 Purple Hearts, 4,000 Bronze Stars, and 21 Medals of Honor.

Source: Just Facts Daily | Rigorously Documented Fact Checks

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1 Comment

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    Mary McGarr

    Roosevelt also included at that time American citizens of German descent. They weren’t rounded up from all over the country, but mostly along the east coast. I’ve only ever run across but one newspaper article about this matter.

    I know about it because my husband’s grandfather was one of the people who were incarcerated. I have the letters that he wrote over the years he was there. He never understood why they had done that to him. He was not an immigrant. His father was and had earned his citizenship in 1850! Considering that he was a vice-President at the Manufacturers Hanover Trust Bank in New York City adds to this mystery. The bank didn’t think he was a German sympathizer and paid his wife his salary at the time of $6,000 a year the entire time he was gone. During WWII that was a pretty good amount.

    It is puzzling why the media never mentions the Germans….

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