Why You Want to Live in a Good School District

Mar 17, 2019 by

Why Living in a Good School District Is So Important

If you’ve ever gone house hunting with a realtor, you might notice that they almost always mention the school district. They’ll say whether it’s good, bad, or middling, but they may not explain why that’s an important factor to so many homebuyers.

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“School districts are an area where many buyers aren’t willing to compromise,” Danielle Hale, chief economist at Realtor.com, wrote in a report. “For many buyers, ‘location, location, location,’ means ‘schools, schools, schools.’”

The report showed that more than 78 percent of surveyed buyers said they would rather buy a less-desirable home if it meant living near a good school.

Why You Want to Live in a Good School District

With a little research on the subject, you’ll want to live in a good school district too. Here are some key reasons why.

  • Education First

You want the best education possible for your kids, and that might mean moving to a better school district to get it.

“Schools are assigned based on where you live,” Zach Hanebrink, a Charleston-based realtor told PublicSchoolReview. “There may be loopholes, magnet or private school opportunities, but neither is a guaranteed option. Most families will remain in their home for at least three years, and this means your children will be at the assigned school during that time period; getting an education and making friends.”

You want a school that has a reputation for molding bright young minds into innovative creators and contributors to society. Too many kids have failed to reach their full potential because they didn’t get a quality education while still living at home.

  • Home Value Stability

Real estate is a relatively stable market, but neighborhoods with poor school districts tend to remain stagnant or even lose value with time. On the flipside, homes in good neighborhoods tend to increase rapidly in value.

Basically, this means that prices of homes in good school districts inflate faster than other areas. Unless your home undergoes significant damage in the time you live there, you stand to make a profit on your home sale instead of taking a loss.

  • Low Crime

Although this is not a hard and fast rule, the vast majority of neighborhoods with a good school district also have low crime rates. You don’t have to worry about your kids playing outside or walking a block to school on their own.

The relationship between low crime rates and good schools is typically related to the education and salaries of those living there. Those with greater education typically make higher salaries and are less likely to commit crimes. They’re also more likely to report suspicious activity and watch out for their neighbors. There’s an indisputable connection here that’s highly appealing for raising a family.

Finding a Good School District

The easiest way to start your search for a good school district is to ask around. Those in your community will undoubtedly have strong opinions about the best schools in town, and it’ll become clear which districts are good and which are not.

You can also go online to check out ratings and reviews. Sites like Neighborhoodscout.com, Niche.com, and GreatSchools.org feature rankings that are super useful in determining the best school district in town.

The Houston property management firm Green Residential recommends going straight to the source:

“Give the district headquarters a call or look up its reports from the preceding year. By examining their test score results, disciplinary problems, and ratings for teachers, you can get a general idea of how good the schools are.”

It’s not important how you discover the best school districts in your town, but it is important that you make an effort to live there. Your children’s future depends on the steps you take now to give them the best education possible.

Photo by Ludovic Charlet on Unsplash

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